Public availability status

Squash

No one is perfect.

Web services go down or go awry. Though what I really loathe is when administrators don’t share that information. Two services I use often are on that shitlist. Flickr and Google. Let me share my experience with Google:

  1. I notice something does not work like it was before
  2. Go through their help system
  3. Perhaps try a search and fail to find what I need
  4. Look at forums
  5. Ponder about posting to the forum, decide against it
  6. Send a mail/feedback (which can be really hard to find)
  7. Get an impersonal blanket response
  8. Later, get a email from Google whether the response was helpful or not… grrr
  9. End up just waiting and retrying again later at some random time

Kudos to Flickr in sense I’ve actually got to speak to a human in this regard. Though all that person did was say sorry and try again later. What Google and Flickr both need sorely is a public status page reporting outages.

Dreamhost do it right with DreamHost status.

Except when Dreamhost posts about machines that I don’t use. It could be a lot better, though if I was using some powerful RSS aggregator I could perhaps filter it.

I know it might look bad to maintain “public availability status” and it could reflect badly on your stock price in the short term. I urge you to think long term and build trust with your customers. Dreamhost went through a rough patch recently and I stuck with them because they seemingly tried their best to make their problems they were experiencing public.

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