Glossary in Latex

Glossaries list difficult or specialized words with their definitions. In XHTML that’s acronym (not abbr).

I can’t help but use strange terminology in my profession, although I think it is important to explain myself as well. Often I lose track of the meaning of acronyms I use every day.

BTW acronyms, abbreviations and glossaries all mean the same things to me right now.

It took me a while, but I managed to add a glossary to my texed thesis.

I used nomenclature package as it was installed on my system. GlossTeX wasn’t.

You need:

\usepackage{nomencl}
\makeglossary
\renewcommand{\nomname}{Glossary}

In the top of your latex source. Somewhere between \documentclass and \begin{document}.

Then you should make definitions of terms when you use them in your document:

\nomenclature{BTW}{By the way}

Then right down at the bottom before your bibliography definition.

\addcontentsline{toc}{section}{Glossary}
\printglossary

Finally you need to throw in something like:


makeindex $(FILENAME).glo -s nomencl.ist -o $(FILENAME).gls

Into your Makefile. Usually I would have put this super tip into my Tips&Tricks, but this blog seems to get much better google treatment. Perhaps I will move the tips someday here to blogland.

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